@GrowMyShelf changes HOW Readers find their next book

Gow your Book ShelfThe problem with @Goodreads, and most other “book library sites” is that they’ve become slaves to the 5 star rating system. One of our favorite movies is “The Incredibles”. Do you remember the bad guy, Syndrome, “Monologuing”? He says something significant as to why we’re building “Grow my Shelf” to combat the 5 star rating system.

“…and when everyone’s super, (Evil Laugh) no-one will be.”

 That’s the five Star system in a nutshell. We’ve fallen into the trap of rating our favorite author’s books highly. But are we really rating them against the whole of everything we’ve read? If we rate every book we read as 4 or 5 stars, then none of them are truly 5 star. The industry thrives, lives and dies, by that same false premise. Every book publisher, author and reseller wants, strives, and demands, their book be rated 5 star. Or it is somehow less readable or saleable. If everything, or a majority, of the books are 5 stars…they’re 5 stars compared to what?

We know that some are better than others, and we would read them again, but others are going to be relegated to the “once was enough” pile. We know we recommend some books to read, while only acknowledging others as “a good read”. We have to REALLY hate a book to give it less than 3 stars…and usually not for the reasons other readers might consider a valid reason to dislike it.

How does the 5 star system fit into refining or narrowing that “My next book” choice matrix? It’s useless. As are most reviews, since the “personal moment” the writer is having while writing their diatribe may not be relevant to what another reader finds interesting or important to books they like to read.

How does a friend, looking at your “online library” list on most book sites, KNOW what books you REALLY liked? And whether you actually hold them in the same regard for the SAME reasons that are important to them? They don’t. We don’t. More importantly YOU don’t.

Some of the sites (with a wink and nod toward their advertisers and publishing partners) try to put a cheesy comparison graphic together. The readers library is compared to one of their “friends”. This is supposed to help the reader find something to read next. We went on a number of friends profiles on Goodreads (and even Amazon) to try and find our next book to read. Those friends had liked EVERYTHING, so everything got a 5 stars. Lots of stars for authors and books we know we disliked, along with others that we did. Add that to a list of books from other genres that we didn’t care for There was NO way for us to find our next book, and “Grow My Shelf”, based on those libraries and site methods.

 
And THAT’s what makes GROW MY SHELF different. Members (It’ll be free to join) will be able to quickly flick through their dashboard and let our algorithms find books they will like based on their shelves and settings…not the 5 star system or the latest “top seller”. Not a comparison to a limited pool. This is all about growing the readers shelf and getting them the next book to read. The “how” is a big ol’ secret, but the results are going to be mind blowing.
 
The Four ways most of us find books:
1) Direct recommendations from trusted friends that we know like the same genre.
2) Amazon’s “Those that bought this also bought” slider.
3) perusing a used book store/book store and spotting a book (cover catches our eye)
4) A reviewer we know and trust recommends it.
A distant hit and miss #5 would be the email blasts from various sites, but those are for the bargain hunters, not necessarily the seriosu reader.

Grow My Shelf rolls all four of those into one interface and supports it’s bushiness plan with a strong financial model. Sign up for our newsletter and follow our FB page to stay in the loop.

The Reader Revolution is starting. Are you ready to join?

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